Food – Drink

Amazon cruises - Food - drink on board riverboats cruise

Eating in the Amazon

The typical dishes of the Amazon people are mainly made up of Manioc, local river fish, and a great variety of tropical fruits. There are around 3000 species of eadible riverfish, spread out through the different Amazon basin countries and within the several regions of each of these countries.

Fruit juices al-galore

The variety of eadible fruits in the Amazon basin is amazing, in Brazil alone there are 150 varieties of different juice fruits to choose from. There are just as many spread out through Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia.

Food on board

The different river cruises we offer are well appointed with a chef and experienced local cooks, they will delight you with the most varied dishes. From exotic local recipes to international cuisine with a local garnish and everything in between. There is something for everyone. Vegetarians need not to worry as their needs will be well taken into account with a variety of salads and fresh local produce on the table.

Chicha and other traditional drinks

In the Amazon tribes of Ecuador and Peru, the natives prepare a local manioc based drink that is fermented with saliva, this is similar to Masata from Brazilian natives. This is as thick as soup it is more of a froth, whenever visiting a local village it is quite probable you will be offered some to taste. Remember it is an insult to reject it.

Etiquette when visiting indigenous tribes

Food is scarce throughout the Amazon basin, there are seldom agricultural lands and soil is poor. The Amazonian indians make the most of what they have, eating is a community interest. Try not sharing junk food and candy with local children as there are few available dentists and they are miles away. If you wish to share, local produce and foods like rice, potatoes, beans are welcome. of course poultry and meat will make a feast.

when eating snacks make sure you carry-out your rubish. Indigenous tribes have no way of recycling or getting rid of in-organic garbage, it will usually end up poluting the rivers, the indigenous are poor people and may not know that these products are not biodegradable.

Try not giving money as a present, you do not want to turn the people, specially children, into beggers. Make sure your gift is given in exchange for a service otherwise your host family might feel obliged to give you a valuable possesion like a spear or vase that has been in the family through various generations.